"My heart rate goes up a lot when I'm training." Careful, you might have an arrhythmia.

Many times we receive in our mail or in our social networks messages like this:

"My heart rate goes up a lot when I'm training, can you help me understand why it happens?"

"I'm 42 years old and, when I'm training, I have peaks of 210 heart beats, is that normal?"

We always respond to these kinds of messages in the same way:

With IDOVEN you can monitor your heart professionally while you train and rest. With our services we will try to understand what these spikes in your pulse are due to: if it is an error in your heartrate monitorwhen measuring it or, if it is really something more serious that involves a heart problem such as arrhythmias known as extrasystoles, tachycardia or atrial fibrillation.

Before going into detail about why these spikes can occur we must find out how the activity is being monitored.

Many pulse meters allow us to measure the pulse with a tape on the chest or with technology called photoplethysmography that detects pulse waves: an infrared light source (LED) emits a beam on the skin to illuminate the small arteries under the skin (you can read the difference between a smarthwatch and IDOVEN's services in this post).

Many times the data we get by measuring on the wrist, using this LED light that most GPS watches and heart rate monitors have underneath, is not completely accurate. This can be due to sweat, wrist movement, not being tight enough or the position of the wrist (when riding a bike for example the wrist is usually a bit elevated). Therefore, data measured on the wrist is not 100% reliable and we at IDOVEN always recommend measurement with an HR strap on the chest, which is much more reliable and accurate than measurement on the wrist.


If the person who has written to us explains, as is the example in the image, that he wears a high-end watch, Suunto Spartan, with a band on his chest and that in his training sessions it has been difficult for him to go beyond 170 beats for years, it makes us see that something in the performance of the sportsman's heart is not working well.

At that time we recommend our servicesWe have also carried out a 7-day or 21-day study to try to find out the cause of asymptomatic episodes like this. In this case, although this person saw after training that the heart rate monitor had recorded peaks of up to 224 beats per minute, during training he had not noticed any symptoms such as dizziness or leg weakness. This long-term study also allows us to study cases in which the athlete does perceive certain symptoms such as chest pains, palpitations, tachycardia, dizziness, fainting or drowning on exertion.

We monitor the sportsman's activity, his rest and the functioning of his heart on a daily basis and in his real training. This data they turn to our technology Wehave also developed a new method for the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries, nourished by artificial intelligence, and wehave obtained the results of the study of the athlete and the recommendations that he should follow so that the problem does not goany further.

From IDOVEN we have always encouraged the practice of sport in a healthy way with the aim of helping to prevent early and non-invasive diseases such as myocardial infarction and sudden death . Our technology allows us to analyze millions of heartbeats of both professional and amateur athletes who hire our services.

If you have had an episode in which your pulse goes off for no reason and you want to know the cause of it tell us your case and we can tell you how IDOVEN can help you to know the state of your heart and that you can practice your favorite sport with peace of mind.

Recent articles

Read All

Idoven raises $19.8 million in funding to redefine detection and precision medicine of cardiovascular diseases with AI

[VIDEO] Manuel Marina, CEO at Idoven, tell you more about our company and the Serie A round

IDOVEN receives €6.5 million of funding from the European Innovation Council